Warning Signs of Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Nicknamed for the fact that they come into your mouth (and your life) by the time you are finally mature and supposedly “wise” wisdom teeth are simply molars in the far back of your mouth. Whether or not these molars cause you problems is anyone’s guess, but if you’re experiencing some specific pain in your gums and jaw, you may be wondering if you have impacted wisdom teeth.

Drs. Bruce Baird, Jeff Buske, and Cindy Knight take care of wisdom teeth from all around Granbury! Let us tell you more about impacted wisdom teeth and what to do if you have them.

What are Impacted Wisdom Teeth?

Your wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars you’ll get. They usually come in when you are between 17 and 21 years old, though some people’s wisdom teeth won’t come until much later, or never at all. (Does that mean they never become wise? Hard to say.)

As with all teeth, wisdom teeth are expected to break through the gums and become totally visible when they emerge. However, in some situations, wisdom teeth stay deep in the jawbone or never break through your gums. In this case, the wisdom teeth are impacted.

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Posted in Dental Health

Senior Dentistry: Embrace Healthy Aging

Someone once said, “Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.” How true!

It can be disorienting and frustrating to watch your health change with age, but you don’t have to accept poor oral health and tooth loss as just a part of the game. On the contrary, your oral health is just as important now as ever, and it’s linked closely with your overall health and wellness.

Embrace healthy, preventative dental hygiene and reap the benefits of improved wellness and vitality during a season of life with so much to look forward to.

When it comes to senior health and dentistry, Drs. Bruce Baird, Jeff Buske, and Cindy Knight share the top concerns you may have, and how to address them:

Gum Disease

A shocking 70% of adults over 65-years-old have gum disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss among seniors.

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Posted in Dental News

TMJ – The Root of Your Pain

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a really long name … so let’s call it TMJ. Ah, yes, that’s right, now the name is more familiar! You’ve heard it before. Maybe even some lingering pain in your chewing muscles and bones has you wondering if you’ve got it.

TMJ dysfunction is sometimes called TMD, TMJD, or TMJ Syndrome if there seems to be a collection of related issues with your jaw. Granbury Dental Center is here to tell you more about TMJ and what to do if you’ve got it.

What is TMJ?

A sailboat requires a complex system of ropes, pulleys, and hooks to catch a wind in the sail and get moving. Your jaw is also made of an incredible team of muscles, bones, joints and tissue in order to function. If anything affects any one part of these pieces in your jaw, it could lead to chronic pain and problems with the joints in your jaw. TMJ is a broad term that includes any of this pain of dysfunction.

TMJ can feel like anything from a headache to an inner ear infection. The pain can move from your face and head down to your neck and shoulders. If you have TMJ, talking, chewing and yawning can be very uncomfortable. You might also hear clicking in your jaw, feel your jaw lock in place, or experience muscle spasms.

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Posted in Dental Services

Dentistry for Kids: What the Tooth Fairy Won’t Tell You

Kids are constantly growing and changing, and their mouths are no exception! Throughout childhood, kids lose their baby teeth, gain adult teeth, and they begin to take ownership over their own oral health. From brushing to braces to practicing their smile, oral health is important for every kid at every stage.

We know you love to see your child smile! Granbury Dental Center does too. Read our tips to learn how to help keep your kid smiling for life.

Caring for Kids Teeth

Your child’s first teeth, often called “baby teeth” make their momentous arrival and continue to serve many purposes until they fall out and are replaced by adult teeth. Baby teeth hold a place in the jaw and pave the way for the adult teeth to grow in properly.

Kids who develop cavities are more likely to develop them later as adults. Don’t dismiss the importance of oral health for kids, even though there’s so much transition in their mouth in these early days.

Basic oral health for kids includes brushing and flossing twice a day. Be sure your child is brushing long enough (and having some fun) by playing a favorite song that’s roughly two minutes long and brush the whole time.

Very young children may still need help and supervision to be sure they’ve thoroughly brushed all their teeth. But don’t wait to teach your kid how to do this on her own—kids are more likely to participate if they feel empowered and valued in the process.

For kids 3 and up, fluoride toothpaste is safe and recommended for the best tooth care and prevention.

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Posted in Dental Health

Dental Inlays & Onlays

Bite. Crack. Ouch!
A cracked or broken tooth is a real problem. Unlike other bones in your body, a tooth will not heal itself and you need to take care of it immediately. Depending on how bad the damage is and where it is located, your dentist will likely recommend an inlay, onlay, or a crown. All versions of the same idea, these restorative dentistry treatments are custom-made covers to protect your tooth and restore it to it’s full, healthy functioning condition.

Another reason you may need an inlay, onlay, or a crown is due to extensive tooth decay that is breaking down your tooth that requires more than a simple filling to fix.

Here’s how your options compare:

  • Fillings: only fill a small, center portion of the biting surface of your tooth and is not a treatment for extensive damage
  • Inlays: fill a larger portion of the biting surface than a filling contained within the cusp
  • Onlays: fill and cover the biting surface of your tooth including up and over the rounded ridges (cusps)
  • Crowns: covers the whole tooth; all or most of the visible portion above your gums

So you see, inlays and onlays are a great, intermediate option between a filling and a crown.

Benefits of Inlays & Onlays

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Posted in Dental Services

Dental Crowns 101

Sometimes in life you just need a do-over. That’s precisely what a crown is—a new start for your tooth.

Teeth are important players in your life—they do everything from begin your digestion to make a great first impression—and you deserve a beautiful, fully functioning set. If your teeth need a boost in any way, or a real makeover, a crown might be just what you need.

A crown is a custom-made shell that fits perfectly over your natural tooth. Crowns look and act exactly like your original tooth, only better. Crowns support broken or badly decayed teeth and they cover and restore discolored teeth. Crowns are also used over dental implants and to build a dental bridge.

Drs. Bruce Baird, Jeff Buske, and Cindy Knight, dentists at Granbury Dental Center, share what you need to know about getting a crown.

If You Need A Crown

Getting a crown usually takes two trips to the dentist. On the first trip, the dentist makes a plan to suit your specific needs and prepares the tooth. You will also get impressions of the tooth so that a crown can be made to fit perfectly over the natural tooth. On the second trip, your crown is installed and cemented on. A crown is a permanent or “fixed” dental piece. This makes it very stable and durable.

In some cases, a crown can be designed, fabricated and placed in a single appointment with the help of advanced same day technology.

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Posted in Dental Services

Baby Dentistry: Teething and Other Joys

It’s easy to think that baby teeth aren’t important. They make their grand entrance (however painfully) and leave your baby’s mouth so soon thereafter. But your baby’s oral health is very important today and to set the stage for a lifetime of health.

Let’s talk about those tiny teeth: teething and how to take care of your baby’s oral health.

Teething Facts

  • Teething begins anywhere from 3-9 months and can continue until your child is 3-years-old. Every baby is different.
  • Teeth emerge in a consistent pattern: lower 2 front incisors; upper 2 front incisors and 2 more lower incisors; first set of molars; canines; then second molars.
  • One reason we get baby teeth is because our baby mouths aren’t big enough for the size and number of adult teeth we need later in life.
  • Babies get 20 teeth that fall out and are followed by 32 adult teeth.
  • Chewing on a cold, wet washcloth, extra snuggles, and a little pain-relieving medicine is certain to help ease the pain of teething.
  • Contrary to popular belief, teething is not proven to cause sickness like diarrhea, fever or a runny nose.
  • Children should see the dentist as soon as their first teeth start coming in.

How To Take Care of Baby Teeth

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Posted in Patient Care

Fluoride: Good or Bad?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the fluoridation of drinking water is ranked among the ten greatest public health achievements of 20th century America. However, a quick search of the internet tells us that fluoride is actually toxic if ingested in large enough quantities. So which is it? Do the health benefits outweigh the negatives of fluoride in toothpaste and drinking water? We at Granbury Dental Center know that Granbury folks care a great deal about their health, so we’ve put this article together to examine the facts and help you come to your own decision. As always, we are happy to answer any questions you might have, so feel free to give us a call!

Why Use Fluoride in the First Place?

In order to understand the controversy, we must first to understand what led to putting fluoride in toothpaste and water. Even today, dental caries (tooth decay) is considered the most prevalent chronic disease in children and adults. With that in mind, it’s not hard to understand why Grand Rapids, Michigan took a leap in 1945, becoming the first city in the world to fluoridate its drinking water supply. The hope was that fluoridation would dramatically reduce the amount of tooth decay in children. After 11 years, the National Institute for Dental Research validated that hope, announcing that fluoridation had coincided with a 60% drop in the rates of tooth decay. Fast forward to 2000 and roughly half of the country’s water supply is fluoridated.

How Does Fluoride Work?

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Posted in Dental News

I’d Rather Have a Root Canal

Have you ever heard someone say, “It was worse than a root canal?” Most of us in Granbury are used to hearing root canals compared some genuinely unpleasant circumstances, but Drs. Baird, Buske, and Knight would like set the record straight and talk about how root canals can do some serious dental good. As always, we are happy to answer any questions you may have, so please feel free to give Granbury Dental Center a call.

Root Canals Save Teeth

Here it comes, the question on everyone’s mind – why on Earth would you want a root canal?! There is one thing all dentists in Granbury and beyond will agree on – saving your natural teeth is always the best option. There are many ways that Drs. Baird, Buske, and Knight can replace missing or damaged teeth, but nothing is as good as the real thing. If you have a tooth with inflamed or infected pulp, a root canal, or endodontic treatment, can get rid of infection and save it. Thus, root canals are preferable to extraction. Here are some more advantages of endodontic treatment:

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Posted in Dental Health

Get Your Beauty Sleep Back with Sleep Apnea Treatment

Sleep_ApneaDo you have a spouse or loved one that complains about your snoring? Do you wake up in the middle of the night gasping for air? Do you find that you are always exhausted during the day and just can’t seem to ever catch up on sleep? If these symptoms sound familiar, you may be one of many Granbury residents suffering from sleep apnea. Dr. Bruce Baird wants you to know you are not alone, there is a solution, and wants to help you get the restful sleep you deserve. Read on to learn about what sleep apnea is and how we can treat it. If you have any questions, our team at Granbury Dental Center is happy to answer them. Feel free to give us a call!

Sleep Apnea and Your Health

Getting restful sleep every night is a crucial part of your daily health. Although snoring may seem harmless, it is actually an indication that your breathing is obstructed, and may be a sign of sleep apnea. Read more ›

Posted in Dental Health, Dental Services, Dental Technology, Patient Care